Friday, September 23, 2005

Sunrise


100_0165
Originally uploaded by nevadog.

On the Tigris in Tikrit, Iraq.

16 comments:

Joe said...

Did you know that Time magazine mentioned your blog as one of the '5 riveting soldier's blogs' to read? This is the firs time I've checked this out. It's so hard for us in America to comprehend what you guys are going through over there. I pray for your safety and that you can return home soon to your family. We haven't forgotten you guys over there.

Joe--Minnesota

Lightning said...

Hi there

I agree with the last comment and trust you will safely return to your family and friends back home. Read about your Blog from the same source as above. It is great to be able to read about your time out in Iraq. I am ex-Royal Air Force (UK) and will keep reading your Blog entries which are so well written.

Wishing you all the best

David

Sgt. Salazar said...

Maybe you could be a WAR correspondent.

Greg Lamberson said...

Hi,

I became aware of your blog from its mention in Time Magazine. As an Army Interrogator and Arabic and Farsi linguist during and after Gulf War I, I was intrigued by the idea of your having this outlet to use while you are working in what are remarkable circumstances.

I would love to chat with you, and I will be watching and reading your blog in the coming days and weeks. So far what I have read is really great.

Allah ma'ek ya sadiqi

Hurria said...

"It's so hard for us in America to comprehend what you guys are going through over there."

Do you even THINK about what Iraqis are going through "overe there"?

Anonymous said...

hurria,

of course we think about what the iraqis are going through. More than Half of America feels this war was unjustified and wrong. Many of us feel the sanctions during Clinton's adminstration were wrongly handled and caused undue suffering.

But what of your fellow Iraqi men who served under Sadam. Do you blame them for the murders, the secret executions, the gassing of your own people. Do you blame those who followed Sadam's orders? Your brothers and fathers and nephews?

Think about it. I'm sure you know good people who were in the Iraqi military who did horrible things.
Do you blame them, or Sadam for his bloodlust?

Rick

Pebble said...

You made Time magazine!

here:

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1106331-1,00.html

Way to go...YEA!


Pebble

Hurria said...

"of course we think about what the iraqis are going through. More than Half of America feels this war was unjustified and wrong."

Yes, I have seen the polls, but I have seen very little indication that anyone understands or cares what Iraqis are suffering.

"Many of us feel the sanctions during Clinton's adminstration were wrongly handled and caused undue suffering."

And yet most seem to think that Iraqis suffered only because Saddam built palaces, not because the U.S. insisted on depriving Iraq of the most basic necessities of life.

"But what of your fellow Iraqi men who served under Sadam. Do you blame them for the murders, the secret executions, the gassing of your own people. Do you blame those who followed Sadam's orders? Your brothers and fathers and nephews?"

None of my brothers, fathers, or nephews has been involved in murdering anyone, executing anyone, or gassing anyone, nor has anyone else I would accept into my life. I have never moved in those particular circles, nor would I accept to under any circumstances.

Having said that, you must understand that you simply cannot equate the position of a member of the American military with someone who held a position in any dictator's regime. I would think that would be obvious if you gave it more than 30 seconds' thought.

"Think about it."

Why don't you take your own advice and think about it.

"I'm sure you know good people who were in the Iraqi military who did horrible things."

No, I do not.

"Do you blame them, or Sadam for his bloodlust?"

Again, you try to make a false analogy between what members of the U.S. military face for refusal and what members of the Iraqi military faced. I suppose if Zach were facing torture and possible execution plus a horrible fate for his entire family I might have a bit more sympathy for his plight, but he is not, so I do not.

Hurria said...

Rick, here is an answer (lightly edited) I posted to you in a thread farther down the page - in case you missed it:

"in that case, Hurria, as an Iraqi, do you feel the same condemnation for your brothers and fathers and nephews who served under Sadam and commited horrible crimes against your own people and others?"

My brothers, fathers, and nephews are/were all physicians, dentists, engineers, scientists, academics, or artists (as are/were myself and all my sisters, mothers, and nieces - women count too, you know). None of them has ever held any kind of position in the military, or in Saddam's government. None of my brothers, fathers and nephews (or sisters, mothers, nieces) ever committed any horrible crimes on behalf of Saddam or anyone else.

"I, as well as many of us here in the us, are horrified by what our leaders do in our name. We do the best we can with what we have."

If you participate in the crimes of your leaders I have no use for you. If you do not participate in the crimes pf your leaders I have no problem with you. If you take action in opposition to your leaders and their crimes I thank you.

Mike Crichton said...

And yet most seem to think that Iraqis suffered only because Saddam built palaces, not because the U.S. insisted on depriving Iraq of the most basic necessities of life.

Hurria, for the amount that Saddam spent on palaces and other forms of self-glorification, those basic necessities could have been provided.

Hurria said...

Mike Chrichton, the direct cause of the massive suffering, death and deterioration of Iraq's infrastructure, medical system (once one of the best in the Middle East), education system (also once one of the best in the Middle East), and of its very society was the U.S.'s 1991 deliberate destruction of vital civilian infrastructure, ongoing regular bombing campaigns, and a regime of outrageously vicious economic sanctions and import restrictions insisted on and administered by the U.S.

Anonymous said...

hurria,

I cannot argue with how you feel. The reason I am against this war and this current US administration is precisely due to things that you have had to endure.

I know that if the US were invaded by an outside force and we had seen innocent civilians killed by enemy solidiers, most of us would feel the way you do.

But, in that case, if there were soldiers who were trying to see past the corrupt policies of their leaders, I would at least acknowledge that bravery. I would hope that I would, anyway.

But I've not been in your shoes, so I am only supposing.

One thing I know though, is that we are all connected in the family of humanity. What we see as outside of ourselves, is really a reflection of ourselves. That may seem too abstract, but I know this to be true - and what it points to is that we all are here to see that we are inseparable.

Religious hatreds distort this truth - sadly the very truth i think they were created to reveal. And until we each awaken to our most essential nature, that which is pure love, we will continue on this path towards more separation and confusion.

To love one's enemy is the most difficult instruction. But it is found in the Sufi tradition, in the Christian tradition, and in the Buddhist tradition. To truly see this one has open one's eyes very wide - beyond just our family, beyond our village/city, even beyond our various nationalities.

And I feel this is the only way any of us will wake up. It is not easy, and as it is said, We are all given what we need in this life to wake up. But no one said it will be an easy ride.

With love for all sides, all directions, all beings,

Rick

MIke Crichton said...

Hurria: If all the money that Saddam spent on his military, his cronies, and himself, all that damage could have been repaired. That was the intention of the sanctions: He'd have been left with just enough resources to cover civilian needs, and not a penny more. In hindsight, we all should have seen how stupid that was, but it seemed like a good idea at the time.

Mike Crichton said...

BTW, Hurria, do you read much science fiction? If so, I'd recommend going to Baen's Bar ( http://bar.baen.com ). There are some forums there that could use your perspective.

Anonymous said...

since no one commented on the actual sunrise, i will. it's very pretty:D!the fence in the picture kind of brings it all into perspective though.

Anonymous said...

Hi Zach -- I love your photos. Keep them coming.
Dianne