Wednesday, January 11, 2006

Life in the Slow Lane

Things are slower over here. I almost forgot about that... The skys are bluer over here and the days are shorter. I haven't had that same urge like I did last time to carry a weapon (like a knife or pistol) with me all the time either. For me this last deployment was not nearly as violent as my first time in Iraq.

I came home to my life again and it still fits. On some level I was afraid that tempting fate again by going back to Iraq was going to be the end of me. In the back of my head I had a feeling that my luck could run out and yet I am back home again (I had promised my family I would make it back). How do you make a promise like that? Just glad I was able to keep it.

Soon this whole chapter of my life will be closed and I will begin writing a new chapter. I am going to be a civilian in April (the end of April). That is when the army will lift my involuntary extention and will let me get out.

I can't say that I am not scared, in fact I am scared to death. Things have a way of working out though and this will work out as well.

10 comments:

till_in_the_clear said...

Fantastic.

My soldier is *fingers crossed* getting out of The army in April as well... He did a year over in Iraq, and a year stateside at Hood since.

You've done us all proud. Maybe not for the things you have seen and done - but certainly for the fact that you COMPLETED your obligation and then some.

Enjoy your freedom - you earned it.
Hell - my soldier says the first thing he is gonna do when he gets home is get a crappy fast food job, and quit on his first day - just for the simple privledge of being able to QUIT.
Rock on.
manda

Jodi said...

glad you are home and things are going well for you.

Anonymous said...

congragulations

Anonymous said...

Glad you don't have any nightmare.

how's the job application?
all da best.

Anonymous said...

Trust in yourself and with our prayers and good wishes things will work out. I've seen from your family snapshots and your passages about them over the year that you are a success. We'll take care of you - you take care of your family. ChrisH

Anonymous said...

I think the post from til_in_ the _clear put it quite well.you have earned your freedom.I hope life brings to you everything you want. good luck and welcome back

Beverly said...

Hi Zach,
I am happy to be reading your writings again. You have been a tremendous help to me in my ability to help other soldiers like you. Come Tuesday, I will probably have one of my patients sit at my computer and read some of your writings. Much of what he talks about is right on target with your writings. He is struggling with PTSD, but it has been helpful as he is able to talk to others who understand.
Thank you.....Beverly

One Veteran said...

"I can't say that I am not scared, in fact I am scared to death. Things have a way of working out though and this will work out as well."

I was only in for three and a half years (a two year punk stop lossed my entire tour in Iraq), but I was just as scared to return to civilian life as you appear to be. Part of it is the army's fault-- they pound it in your head that the civilian world is unpredictable and unforgiving, without job security, ect. The freedom is simultaneously intoxicating and frightening. I am sure that you will be able to find something to do to pass the time and provide for your family, without it being too much of a drag. Enjoy life in the states, and your last few months of the army.

Tickneen said...

Dude, there is no way they can make you go back to Iraq is there?

tmg said...

"I can't say that I am not scared, in fact I am scared to death. Things have a way of working out though and this will work out as well."

Word.